Stop-and-Frisk: Protection or Discrimination?

In the year 1994, the Mayor of New York initiated a stop-and-frisk law in an effort to reduce crime and gun violence. Under the law, police officers may stop, question, and frisk anyone who they deem reasonably suspicious. While designed as a crime deterrent and to help keep the public safe, is this protection or discrimination?

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Pointers To Know When Getting Pulled Over

Have you even been pulled over before by the police when driving around in your automobile? If you are honest with yourself, it is something we all dread, no matter what the scenario is. Chances are, there’s a least a thing or two you would change if you could go back and do it all over again.

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Arrested for What? Top 25 Weirdest Laws in U.S.

If you believe average statistics about Americans following / breaking laws, then you will learn that the average American violates a minimum of two laws each day. As hard as some of us try to abide by the law, everyone will break at least one eventually. The following infographic takes a looks at some of the weirdest laws on the books.

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Technological Innovations in Criminal Justice

When first introduced as a criminal investigation tactic in the early 1900’s, the idea of fingerprinting to identify criminals was a revolutionary crime-fighting tactic. It is still a common practice used to identify suspects and to analyze a crime scene, today. Advancements in scientific technology play a critical role in improving the process of criminal justice investigation.

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10 Ways Men Get Caught Cheating: Then Vs. Now

It is always a terrible thing when someone cheats on their partner. Today, with all of the advancements in technology, leaving a train of infidelity evidence is easier than you might think. In this infographic, explore 10 ways men can get caught cheating in today’s world as opposed to how they used to get caught years and years ago.

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Sometimes We Can’t Help Even Though We Want To

It’s been more than 15 years since the divorce from my wife, Lynn. She was also a licensed P.I. and held an especially unique talent when operating in an undercover capacity. Often, the cover doesn’t require a particular identity or occupation so she was able to operate as herself and when not on assignment for the agency, she was constantly traveling abroad to many popular resort hotels for a timeshare resale company with a primary objective of acquiring an owners list for that particular property.

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Sometimes Proving Murder Is Not Enough

After receiving a call from my client, Mitch, a prominent defense attorney, I jumped in my car and drove over to his office. Waiting there were two men, a retired New York Police Department detective and his son, Daniel, a 25-year-old Emergency Medical Technician. Mitch had mentioned that it was a murder case, but failed to tell me it was actually a “double homicide” — two women, shot in the head, at point blank range, with a .22 caliber hand gun.

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Luck Helps in Missing Persons Cases

Missing person cases are seemingly a common assignment for P.I.’s, but truthfully, they’re not. In fact, I’d be surprised if half of the P.I.’s even knew where to start, unless they had law-enforcement training, particularly with the F.B.I. Let’s face it — if your child didn’t come home from school one day or your spouse from work, who are you going to think about calling first? It will be the police, even though they will tell you that you have to wait 24 hours before making an official report.

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Sometimes You Work For the Bad Guys

Sometimes being a spy means you have to work for the bad guys, the wise guys and even the murderers. Donald Leroy Evans was a murderer, but not just any ordinary murderer — he was a serial killer, perhaps self-proclaimed, but nevertheless. The FBI couldn’t figure it out one-way or another, so in the book, “Encyclopedia of Serial Killers,” you’ll find his photograph pasted right on the front cover, just beneath Charles Manson. My client proudly claimed to have killed more than 70 people, mostly women and children, making him the most prolific killer in U.S. history. You may ask, “How did I come to help represent him in his murder trial?”

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